Benefits of I.S.S.E.S. Membership

Dear Prospective International Stationary Steam Engine Society Member:

The purpose of this page is to describe the format and editorial content of the I.S.S.E.S. Bulletin, so that you can decide whether the material will be of interest to you. If you decide to join the International Stationary Steam Engine Society (I.S.S.E.S.), you will receive four issues of the I.S.S.E.S. Bulletin. Also, you will be entitled to purchase Stationary Power, the Journal of the International Stationary Steam Engine Society, which contains more detailed and extensive studies of stationary steam engines.

Each quarterly issue of the I.S.S.E.S. Bulletin contains 60 pages measuring
5-1/2 inches wide by 8-1/4 inches high. The articles are generously illustrated with black and white photographs, and although the I.S.S.E.S. Bulletin is not printed on glossy paper, the quality of the reproduction is quite high.

The I.S.S.E.S. Bulletin is truly an international publication, with articles devoted to stationary steam engines located in Great Britain, the USA, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and Asia. The large majority of the articles are devoted to steam in the British Isles and the United States, and the articles focus primarily on reciprocating stationary and marine steam engines. Considerable coverage, however, is also given to steam turbines, boilers: auxiliaries, and the machines powered by steam engines, e.g.. electric generators, pumps, mine ventilating fans and hoists. Very little editorial coverage is given to railway locomotives and model engines, since these are the focus of several other excellent publications.

I.S.S.E.S. is a small all-volunteer organization, relying heavily on members to contribute articles for publication. While membership certainly does not carry any obligation to contribute, and non-contributing members are entirely welcome, we are very grateful for written submissions describing your steam related experiences, e.g., museum visits, engines in use or abandoned that you have encountered, historical information that has come to your attention, engine rescue and restoration projects, and business ventures involving steam engines. When submitting articles, members need not be concerned about writing skills, because it is the information that is important. The I.S.S.E.S. Bulletin editors will correct any compositional glitches, typos, or misspellings that may have slipped into your submission.

To get a further feel for the types of articles appearing in the I.S.S.E.S. Bulletin, visit the four web pages on this site which are devoted to sample articles.

UK Article 1 UK Article 2 USA Article 1 USA Article 2

Sincerely,
The Officers & Members of I.S.S.E.S.


 

Shown here is the Front Cover Illustration from I.S.S.E.S. Bulletin 1991-4, depicting a classic American 'walking beam' engine for a sidewheel paddle steamer built in 1884.

Source: Matchoss C; Die Entwicklung der Dampfmaschine; 1908 (Reprinted 1987, VDI Verlag, Dusseldorf) Vol. 1, P. 644

 

 

Shown here is the Back Cover Illustration from I.S.S.E.S. Bulletin 1991-4, depicting Stevens' drop valve gear as applied to the engine on the front cover.

Source: Matchoss C; Die Entwicklung der Dampfmaschine; 1908 (Reprinted 1987, VDI Verlag, Dusseldorf) Vol. 1, P. 645

 

Shown here is the Front Cover Illustration from Stationary Power, the Journal of the International Stationary Steam Engine Society, No: 10

The front cover illustration depicts Corliss' second engine, a single cylinder condensing beam engine, cylinder 38" diameter X 6' stroke, with a cut gear flywheel 16' diameter X 15" face. The engine weighed 13 tons, and was built for the Wamsutta Mills of New Bedford, Massachusetts, in 1848. Price of the engine, jack wheel, shaft, and boilers "all set up" was $18,500. The engine produced an average of 200 horsepower, and was still running in 1870.

This illustration is reprinted by courtesy of the Smithsonian Institution, No. 87-10190

 

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